Archive

Multnomah

November 5, 2014 - - 2:50 PM

Since I don’t want to screw up this beautiful shawl (again), I have written a small Python script for myself. Now I know the total stitches per row for the garter stitch center triangle  and the number of stitches on each side of the 5 center stitches between the two markers.

Row Stitches
at end of row
Left and right stitches
from center stitch
1 13 4 – 5 – 4
2 17 6 – 5 – 6
3 19 7 – 5 – 7
4 23 9 – 5 – 9
5 25 10 – 5 – 10
6 29 12 – 5 – 12
7 31 13 – 5 – 13
8 35 15 – 5 – 15
9 37 16 – 5 – 16
10 41 18 – 5 – 18
11 43 19 – 5 – 19
12 47 21 – 5 – 21
13 49 22 – 5 – 22
14 53 24 – 5 – 24
15 55 25 – 5 – 25
16 59 27 – 5 – 27
17 61 28 – 5 – 28
18 65 30 – 5 – 30
19 67 31 – 5 – 31
20 71 33 – 5 – 33
21 73 34 – 5 – 34
22 77 36 – 5 – 36
23 79 37 – 5 – 37
24 83 39 – 5 – 39
25 85 40 – 5 – 40
26 89 42 – 5 – 42
27 91 43 – 5 – 43
28 95 45 – 5 – 45
29 97 46 – 5 – 46
30 101 48 – 5 – 48
31 103 49 – 5 – 49
32 107 51 – 5 – 51
33 109 52 – 5 – 52
34 113 54 – 5 – 54
35 115 55 – 5 – 55
36 119 57 – 5 – 57
37 121 58 – 5 – 58
38 125 60 – 5 – 60
39 127 61 – 5 – 61
40 131 63 – 5 – 63
41 133 64 – 5 – 64
42 137 66 – 5 – 66
43 139 67 – 5 – 67
44 143 69 – 5 – 69
45 145 70 – 5 – 70
46 149 72 – 5 – 72
47 151 73 – 5 – 73
48 155 75 – 5 – 75
49 157 76 – 5 – 76
50 161 78 – 5 – 78
51 163 79 – 5 – 79
52 167 81 – 5 – 81
53 169 82 – 5 – 82
54 173 84 – 5 – 84
55 175 85 – 5 – 85
56 179 87 – 5 – 87
57 181 88 – 5 – 88
58 185 90 – 5 – 90
59 187 91 – 5 – 91
60 191 93 – 5 – 93
61 193 94 – 5 – 94
62 197 96 – 5 – 96
63 199 97 – 5 – 97
64 203 99 – 5 – 99
65 205 100 – 5 – 100
66 209 102 – 5 – 102
67 211 103 – 5 – 103
68 215 105 – 5 – 105
69 217 106 – 5 – 106
70 221 108 – 5 – 108
71 223 109 – 5 – 109
72 227 111 – 5 – 111

 

 

(4) Japanese craft books: How to read a Japanese pattern – Knitting

April 10, 2010 - - 4:56 PM

As I have listed in my last post about crocheting from Japanese patterns, there are many useful resources on the web that can help you. The same is true for knitting Japanese style:

As for crochet, these things also apply for knitting:

If you know about any other useful websites, I would love to hear about it.

(1) Japanese craft books: Where to find Japanese books or patterns

March 12, 2010 - - 4:18 PM

1. Buying Japanese books

If you have a local book store that does sell Japanese craft books, then you can consider yourself lucky.

If you don’t, then you can shop online:

  • There is Amazon.co.jp, which has an “In English” link (in the top right corner). If you click it, it shows most of the content in English, so you can order books without understanding Japanese.
    As the other Amazon websites it is safe to use and the delivery is fast and reliable, but it is not exactly cheap, if you have to pay shipping costs.
  • Yesasia.com is available in English and under certain conditions the shipping is free internationally. Like Amazon it also recommends other products you might be interested in.
  • Usually you go to Etsy.com for exquisite handmade objects, but you can also look there for Japanese craft books. The advantage is that you can ask questions about the publication to the seller. You are also likely to support the same kind of addicts you (probably) are yourself ;-).

If those three stores do not satisfy your needs, you can find even more links on Crafting Japanese.

2. Downloading free Japanese patterns

There are at least two sites that offer free patterns:

  • Pierrot offers so many patterns on their page, that you probably do not know where to even start. Thankfully there is an overview by category.
  • Clover also features many patterns on their site.

Dancingbarefoot has an excellent overview of links to these and other sites. If there are any other sites you like to visit, then please tell me about them.

The next post will be about understanding the Japanese craft books, you have acquired.

UPDATE: Another great site with free patterns is Atelier.

Series: Japanese craft books and patterns

March 8, 2010 - - 3:15 PM

Lately I have been quite fascinated with Japanese craft books. To get an idea of what kind of books are out there for people who love knitting, crocheting, sewing or beading, check out Crafting Japanese.

Why would you want to take a look at these publications for junkies of handmade stuff? Well, they are different!

  • First of all, they are comparatively easy to understand most of the time.  They use lots of pretty pictures as well as diagrams and symbols to guide you, especially the international crochet and knitting language.
    Of course, it does not hurt, if you can read Japanese, but the point is that usually you do not have to in order to create the project.
  • The Japanese culture has created a unique visual aesthetic. The style you see in the publications reflects this view in its photography, the handmade objects themselves, the choice of patterns and colors as well as the use of materials. The style ranges from Zen simplicity and timeless elegance to stunning complexity or overloading cuteness.
  • You learn different ways of crafting and have the chance to experiment with new stitch patterns, techniques and materials. I love the challenge of trying to understand how a piece was designed so I can create it myself. Japanese publications have certainly influenced the way I knit and crochet.

In the following blog articles I will show you, where to get Japanese books, magazines and patterns, how to read the diagrams and symbols and how to understand and translate Japanese at least partially.

UPDATE: I have found a comparision of the American and Japanese style of presenting and knitting lace. Although the review is three years old now, there are many valid points in there I do agree with.

(3) How to destash – Sock yarn

January 25, 2010 - - 2:30 PM

Although I have not knitted one single sock yet, I own a lot of sock yarn.

Thanks to Raverly and many very clever people I have found out that you sock yarn is actually good for many things besides keeping feet beautiful and warm.

I would like to attempt the following projects:

  • There are so many beautiful shawls to knit. I would love to try Multnomah (direct download), the one skein stole or even Traveling Woman, if I manage not to mess up even easy lace patterns anymore. Some yarn is just too gorgeous too be hidden in shoes.
  • If you want to use up a huge amount of left over sock yarn, you could knit a huge blanket like the Barn Raising Quilt. If you do not want to buy the book, there is a very similar free pattern at knit me a river (knitted version) or Without Seams (crocheted version).  I could also imagine knitting an afghan with mitred squares or another shape like little fish.

If I manage to finish some of these projects this year I am sure that my stash will be greatly reduced.

Do you know of any other fun projects with sock yarn?

http://knitalong.net/?page_id=35

Knit Green by Joanne Seiff

January 12, 2010 - - 9:05 PM

Firstly I would like to mention the positive aspects about this book:

  • It does not preach. Every step to environmentally conscious living counts and you simply take it as far as you are willing to go. Although I believe that you need to push yourself out of your comfort zone from time to time, taking one step at a time to not get overwhelmed is definitely something I can agree with.
  • There are many useful projects in this book that enable you to integrate knitting projects easily into your everyday life. Cushions, placemats and curtains are things that I can put to good use in my household.

Now on to the things that impressed me only slightly:

  • If you have already read about the diversity of yarn, e.g. in “No Sheep for You“, you know that there is hemp, soy and bamboo fiber out there and you have probably already bought organic cotton or another sustainable fiber. There simply was not much new information here for me.
  • Over the past years I have tried to buy animal-free products as well as shop organic and fair trade. Therefore there was not much in this book that inspired me beyond what I am already living.

If you have not read about these topics before and if you like some simple and practical knits, then you might enjoy this book. If on the other hand you have already given these issues some thought then you might look for another read.

As an overall rating I give it 3 points out of 5.

(2) How to destash – Cotton

January 8, 2010 - - 2:44 PM

If you do not feel like making dish cloths, tea pot cozies and pot holders (and for some reason I never do), then you need some other projects that make use of your cotton yarn.

Cotton is not my favorite choice of yarn, but from time to time I buy a few skeins for a specific project. Therefore I never have more than one to three skeins of one particular cotton yarn and color left over.

Following projects look rather tempting to me:

I would love to know how you reduce your cotton stash!

Now I have to think about what I will do about my hills of sock yarn turning into mountains.

(1) How to destash – Acrylic

January 2, 2010 - - 9:09 PM

After I admitted to myself, that I had a stash problem, my focus is now to slowly reduce the amount of yarn piling up around me.

When I started knitting in February last year I didn’t mind using acrylic yarn to learn. Of course, as soon as I knew how to knit a straight row I wanted higher quality yarn.

I don’t like acrylic fiber on my body, because it just doesn’t breath. So wristwarmers or hats were not an option. Besides, I like to knit something practical and useful from time to time.

So here are options that I will try this year to get rid off all my eeky acrylic yarns:

  • Japanese scrubbies are called “Tawashi”. You can find a very detailed crochet pattern including photos at craftstylish. There are less knitting than crochet patterns, but there is a translation from a cute Japanese fishy pattern translated by Rhonda White at knittingknonsense.
  • If you sew or know someone you does, you could go for a pincushion. I think I will either try this knitted pattern by Kris Patey or this crocheted frog at Roman Sock.
  • I am definitely in need of a clothes pin bag. There is a crochet pattern over at myrecycledbags made with plastic yarn. I have actually found a knitted version at craftster for free, but since I own Home by Debbie Bliss, I will try her version from the book.

Do you have any others ideas, what acrylic yarn could be used for? I would love to hear them.

Next I will try to figure out, what to do with my cotton yarn.